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How to vote for the Liberal Democrats



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Hello, I’m Senator Leyonhjelm of the Liberal Democrats,

and I want to talk to you about how you can make your vote count in this election.

On the very large white ballot paper, which is for the Senate,

you can vote above OR below the line,

but you can’t do both.

Because the system is different from what it was last time,

we recommend voting above the line only.

Vote 1 for the Liberal Democrats, and then vote for as many other parties as you like.

The ballot paper will tell you to number at least six, but that’s not compulsory.

Your vote is valid as long as you vote for at least 1 party.

If you are normally a Liberal voter, you can vote 1 for the Liberal Democrats, then 2 for the Liberals.

You can continue to number the other boxes if you wish,

or put other parties in between the two,

or stop right there and enjoy the rest of your day.

If you are normally a Labor voter,

you can vote 1 for the Liberal Democrats and 2 for Labor,

and so on.

If you are a Greens voter, you should just stay at home!

You can also vote for any minor parties that you like and leave blank those you could never support.

If you don’t give them a number, your vote will not help them get elected.

You have full control over your preferences.

On the green ballot paper, which is for the lower house, you need to number every square.

If the Liberal Democrats are running in that seat, put them at number 1,

then number the other candidates in the order of your choice.

In many cases we will recommend the order and invite you to follow it, but it’s up to you.

If the Liberal Democrats are not running, vote any way you like. The power is in your hands.