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LearningTools: Reading Syringes



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- [Josh] Hi.

I'm Josh Farquharson and welcome to Reading Syringes.

Learning how to read a syringe

could be the difference between giving patients

the correct dose of medication and helping them

or giving the patients wrong doses of medication

and harming them.

By the end of this lesson, you will

identify and interpret the graduation marks

on various syringes,

determine the amount of medication

in various types of syringes.

First,

we will examine the parts of the syringe.

The tip is where the needle hub attaches to the syringe.

The barrel is a reservoir

for holding the syringes contents.

The content may include liquids or gases,

but for the rest of this lesson,

I will just refer to the content as medication.

Flanges provide a surface for the clinician

to securely grasp the syringe

during injection procedures.

The plunger moves back and forth inside the barrel

of the syringe.

This allows the clinician to draw medication

into the syringe and expel medication out of the syringe.

At the top of the plunger is a rubbery tip

called the stopper.

The stopper prevents medication

from leaking around the plunger.

You will notice that the stopper has a top ring

and a bottom ring.

The top ring acts as an indicator

for measuring the medication contained within the barrel

of the syringe.

On the barrel are bold graduation marks.

Graduation marks allow for the measurement

of the syringe's contents.

The first graduation mark represents zero

while the last graduation mark

represents the syringe's capacity

or the total amount the syringe was designed to hold.

These marks typically represent cubic centimeters, ccs,

milliliters, mLs or units.

If you see syringes that have ccs, mLs or both, don't worry,

the amounts are equivalent.

One cc is the same as one mL.

We will cover the graduation marks on five milliliter,

three milliliter, one milliliter, and U-100 syringes.

There are many other sizes of syringes,

but once you finish this lesson,

you will feel confident in reading syringes of any size.

Now let's focus on interpreting the values

of the graduation marks on the syringes.

To interpret the values of graduation marks,

we will use a three-step process.

Step one, determine the increments

of the visible numbers.

To find the increment,

observe the visible numbers

and determine how much they are increasing by.

On this five milliliter syringe,

this line represents one milliliter,

this represents two milliliters and so on.

Therefore, the visible numbers are increasing

in increments of one.

Step two, count the steps to the next visible number.

First, I want you to notice that you have long lines

which have the visible numbers next to them

and the short lines which do not have any visible numbers

next to them.

So to determine the values of those shorter lines,

we will count how many lines it takes to get

from one visible number to the next visible number.

We will use a line of the first visible number, one,

as your starting point.

With your finger on the starting point,

count how many steps it takes for you to land

on the next visible number.

One step, two step, three steps, four steps, and five.

It takes five steps to get to the next visible number.

Notice that we did not include the starting point

as one of the steps.

We only counted the lines

after the starting point and stopped counting

once we landed on the line of the next visible number.

So the answer to step two is five.

It took five steps for us to get to the next visible number.

Step three, divide the increment by the number of steps.

For step three,

all you need to do is divide the answer

from step one by the answer in step two.

When the increment of one

is divided by the number of steps, five, it equals 0.2.

Therefore, each line on the syringe

represents a value of 0.2.

That means this line indicates a value of 0.2 milliliters.

This is 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1,

1.2, 1.4 and so forth.

So how much does this line represent?

If you stated 3.4 milliliters, you are correct.

How about this line?

If you stated 4.8, you are correct.

Now let's get a little more realistic.

Instead of using an arrow,

let's use the top ring of the stopper

as our indicator and fill the syringe with medication.

When observing the stopper,

you will notice that there is a bit of a cone shape

at the tip.

Ignore the cone-shaped area

and measure the amount of medication

by focusing only on the top ring of the stopper.

For example, notice the top ring highlighted in red

is touching the two milliliter line.

This indicates that this syringe contains two milliliters

of medication.

You try the next one.

How much medication is in this syringe?

If you stated 0.6 milliliters, you are correct.

One more.

How much medication is in this syringe?

If you stated 3.2 milliliters, you are correct.

Great job.

Now that you are comfortable

with reading a five milliliter syringe,

we will use this three-step process

to read the next few syringes.

Let's apply the steps to reading

this three milliliter syringe.

Step one, determine the increments of the visible numbers.

The visible numbers are 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2

and so on.

That means the visible numbers are increasing

in increments of half or 0.5.

Step two, count the steps to the next visible number.

Our starting point is 0.5.

And as you see, it takes five steps

after the starting point to land on the next visible number.

Step three, divide the increment by the number of steps.

When the increment of 0.5

is divided by the number of steps, five,

it equals 0.1 ml.

Therefore, each line on the syringe

represents a value of 0.1 mls.

This line is 0.1.

This is 0.2, 0.3

and so on.

Now that we know the value of all the graduation marks,

let's determine the amount of medication in the syringe.

How much medication is in this syringe?

If you stated 0.7 milliliters, you are correct.

Try one more.

How much medication is in this syringe?

If you stated 1.9 milliliters, you are correct.

Great job.

Now we'll just apply the steps

to reading a one milliliter syringe.

Step one, determine the increments of the visible numbers.

The visible numbers are 0.1, 0.2, 0.3

and so on.

That means the visible numbers are increasing

in increments of 0.1.

Step two, count the steps to the next visible number.

Our starting point is 0.1.

And as you see, it takes 10 step

after the starting point to land on the next visible number.

Step three, divide the increment by the number of steps.

When the increment of 0.1

is divided by the number of steps, 10,

it equals 0.01 milliliters.

Therefore, each line

on the syringe represents a value of 0.01 milliliters.

So this line is 0.01.

This is 0.02, 0.03

and so on.

Let's jump ahead

so you can get a better idea

of how the marks increase throughout the syringe.

Here is 0.09.

Here is 0.1, but to make this a bit more intuitive,

you can also look at this line as being 0.10

because after 0.10 is 0.11, 0.12

and so on.

So what is the value of this line?

If you stated 0.21, you are correct.

Now that you know the value

of all the graduation marks,

let's determine the amount of medication in the syringe.

How much medication is in the syringe?

If you stated 0.59 milliliters, you are correct.

Try one more.

How much medication is in this syringe?

If you stated 0.65 milliliters, you are correct.

Great job.

And that brings us to our last syringe, the U-100 syringe.

The U-100 syringe is commonly used for insulin injections

and doses of insulin are measured in units.

Therefore, instead of saying milliliters

in your final answer,

for this syringe, you will state units in your final answer.

Now let's apply the three-step process

to this 100 unit syringe.

Step one, determine the increments of the visible numbers.

The visible numbers are 10, 20, 30, 40,

and so on.

That means the visible numbers are increasing

in increments of 10 units.

Step two, count the steps to the next visible number.

Our starting point is 10.

And as you see,

it takes five steps to land on the next visible number.

Step three, divide the increment by the number of steps.

When the increment of 10 is divided by the number

of steps, five, it equals two.

Therefore each line on the syringe

represents a value of two units.

This line is two, this is four, six,

and so on.

And now that you know the value

of all the graduation marks,

let's determine the amount of medication in the syringe.

So how much medication is in this syringe?

If you stated 38 units, you are correct.

One more.

How much medication is in this syringe?

If you stated 74 units, you are correct.

Well, we went through all of the syringes,

but before I end this lesson

I want to test your skills with a few random syringes.

So once the syringe appears on your screen,

press pause to figure out the answer

and then press play when you're ready to view the answer.

You're ready?

Let's begin.

How much medication is in this three milliliter syringe?

How much medication is in this one milliliter syringe?

How much medication is in this U-100 syringe?

And how much medication is in this five milliliter syringe?

So did you answer all of them correctly?

Great job and give yourself a huge pat on the back

for a job well done.

And there you have it.

You have learned to

identify and interpret the graduation marks

on various syringes

and determine the amount of medication

in various types of syringes.

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Thank you for watching this video.